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Friday September 23, 2011 8:40 am

Mike Modano signs with Dallas Stars, retires




Posted by Adrien Griffin Categories: Athletes, NHL

Mike ModanoAs so many fine hockey players have this summer, Mike Modano is officially retiring from the NHL. However, he first had to finish with his latest contract – a one-day deal with the Dallas Stars valued at $999,999, which provided a sense of closure to the former number 9 and fans of the franchise all around, as Modano spent 20 of his 21 NHL seasons in the Minnesota/Dallas organization. Modano will go down as one of – if not the greatest American-born player in NHL history.

 

Modano broke into the NHL in 1989 as a member of the North Stars. He quickly became a “star,” for lack of a better term, and although it wasn’t until 2003 that he became the team captain after its move to Dallas in 1993, Modano was truly the face of the franchise for years prior. He never won any significant awards other than a Stanley Cup in 1999, but that doesn’t mean he wasn’t as great a player or person as any of the NHL’s top names in the last two decades.

Modano played in 1,499 career games, scoring 561 goals and totaling 1,374 points. The eight-time All-Star holds several prestigious records. Among American-born players, he’s scored more goals and tallied more points than any other in the regular season and the playoffs. He’s also played in more games than any other American as a forward. He also holds many franchise records, including most goals, assists, points and games.

Modano almost spent his entire career with the same franchise, which is becoming more and more rare. If not for a forgettable season with Detroit last year, Modano could have done the improbable. But still, he gets to retire as a Star, and it’s only a matter of time before he’s enshrined into several hockey Halls of Fame. Is Modano the greatest American-born player ever? Just try to find someone who’s better.

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